Muscular development steroids

In the 1860s, descriptions of boys who grew progressively weaker, lost the ability to walk, and died at an early age became more prominent in medical journals. In the following decade, [34] French neurologist Guillaume Duchenne gave a comprehensive account of the most common and severe form of the disease, which now carries his name—Duchenne MD. It soon became evident that the disease had more than one form. [35] The other major forms are Becker, limb-girdle, congenital, facioscapulohumeral, myotonic, oculopharyngeal, distal, and EDMD. [9] Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, being caused by a mutation of a gene located on the X chromosome, predominantly affect males, although females can sometimes have severe symptoms, as well. Most types of MD are multisystem disorders with manifestations in body systems including the heart, gastrointestinal system, nervous system, endocrine glands, eyes, and brain. [9]


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Muscular Christianity spread to other countries in the 19th century. It was well entrenched in Australian society by 1860, though not always with much recognition of the religious element. [21] In the United States it appeared first in private schools and then in the YMCA and in the preaching of evangelists such as Dwight L. Moody . [22] (The addition of athletics to the YMCA led to, among other things, the invention of basketball and volleyball .) Parodied by Sinclair Lewis in Elmer Gantry (though he had praised the Oberlin College YMCA for its "positive earnest muscular Christianity") and out of step with theologians such as Reinhold Niebuhr , its influence declined in American mainline Protestantism . Nonetheless, it was felt in such evangelical organizations as the Fellowship of Christian Athletes , Athletes in Action , and the Promise Keepers . [23]

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Has individual become inactive? Does individual have a sedentary job?
  • Does individual have any diseases that affect nerves supplying the muscles?
  • Does individual have diseases of the muscle itself?
  • Does individual have a systemic illness?
  • Was individual using or abusing drugs such as opiates, steroids, or alcohol?
  • Did individual wear a cast or experience other immobilization?
  • Does individual complain of loss of strength and muscle fatigue?
  • What muscles are affected? Is there a pattern to the symptoms?
  • On exam, was lack of muscle tone and weakness noted?
  • Were limb circumference measurements done?
  • Were sensation and reflexes diminished, absent, or normal?
  • Were EMG and muscle biopsy done?
  • Was MRI necessary?
  • Were conditions with similar symptoms ruled out?
  • Is there a family history of muscle atrophy in the particular location?
Regarding treatment:
  • Is individual exercising regularly or enrolled in a physical therapy program?
  • Was transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) administered, if appropriate?
  • Was low-voltage electromuscular stimulation (EMS) needed?
  • Was bracing necessary?
  • Were anabolic steroids administered, if appropriate?
Regarding prognosis:
  • Is individual continuing to participate in a home exercise program?
  • Is individual's employer able to accommodate any necessary restrictions?
  • Does individual have any conditions that may affect the ability to recover?
  • Does individual’s muscular atrophy cause mechanical strain affecting other muscles or joints?
Source: Medical Disability Advisor

Muscular development steroids

muscular development steroids

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Has individual become inactive? Does individual have a sedentary job?
  • Does individual have any diseases that affect nerves supplying the muscles?
  • Does individual have diseases of the muscle itself?
  • Does individual have a systemic illness?
  • Was individual using or abusing drugs such as opiates, steroids, or alcohol?
  • Did individual wear a cast or experience other immobilization?
  • Does individual complain of loss of strength and muscle fatigue?
  • What muscles are affected? Is there a pattern to the symptoms?
  • On exam, was lack of muscle tone and weakness noted?
  • Were limb circumference measurements done?
  • Were sensation and reflexes diminished, absent, or normal?
  • Were EMG and muscle biopsy done?
  • Was MRI necessary?
  • Were conditions with similar symptoms ruled out?
  • Is there a family history of muscle atrophy in the particular location?
Regarding treatment:
  • Is individual exercising regularly or enrolled in a physical therapy program?
  • Was transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) administered, if appropriate?
  • Was low-voltage electromuscular stimulation (EMS) needed?
  • Was bracing necessary?
  • Were anabolic steroids administered, if appropriate?
Regarding prognosis:
  • Is individual continuing to participate in a home exercise program?
  • Is individual's employer able to accommodate any necessary restrictions?
  • Does individual have any conditions that may affect the ability to recover?
  • Does individual’s muscular atrophy cause mechanical strain affecting other muscles or joints?
Source: Medical Disability Advisor

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